Overview/Itinerary

About Har Ki Dun Trek (Garhwal Himalayas)

- Trekking In Uttarakhand:

Cradle shaped hanging valley in Garhwal Himalayas is our trekking location Har Ki Doon Valley. Cover by snow peaks and alpine vegetation, the valley is above the sea level. It is connected to Bapsa Valley and is snow-covered from December to March. Our trek starts from Taluka village and passes through many other communities like Gangaad, Osala, and Seema. The site is a delight for trekkers, both in summer and winter and is accessible through Govind National Park. We will trek along the Thamsa River till we reach Har Ki Dun Valley. Since the trekking trail isn’t used, birds and animals thrive in this region. One can spot langoor families near Puani Garaat. Black bears, wild boars, and Barasingha are few of the other animals you can detect if you’re lucky. Golden eagles and massive Himalayan griffins also live here.

Basic Details of Har Ki Dun Valley Trek:

  • Location: Garhwal Himalayas, Uttarakhand.
  • Duration: 7 days / 6 nights
  • Maximum altitude: Jaundhar Glacier (4300m / 14107 ft.)
  • Grade: Easy to Moderate
  • Cost: Rs. 12,000 + 5% GST. (Dehradun to Dehradun)

For booking you can make 50% payment now and 50% payment 8 days prior to the event.

How to reach Har Ki Dun Valley Trek:

By Air

Dehradun brings the closest to our base location with the airport Jolly Grant. It is well connected to all the states and city with a daily flight from Delhi.

By Train

From Delhi - DDN NZM AC EXPRESS (2205)

From Kolkata - Doon Express (13009)

From Mumbai - Dehradun Express (19019)

From Chennai - Dehradun express (12687)

By Road

Dehradun is well connected by roads across the country with NH 72 connecting regions like Panchkula, Chandigarh, and Shimla. There are ample local and private buses to Dehradun.

Har Ki Doon Valley Trek Itinerary

Day 1: Dehradun to Sankri drive | 7-8 hours' drive  187 km

We start the journey early from Dehradun and drive initially to the famous hill station of Mussoorie. After just over 100 km, we pass close to the temple of Lakhamandal. According to locals, Duryodhana of the epic Mahabharata conspired to burn the Lakshagriha house of the Pandavas in this area. Damta, Purola, Mori and Netwar are some of the other villages on the route. We follow the river Yamuna upstream. The river Kamal Ganga merges with Yamuna near Naugaon and accompanies us till Purola. Purola is the last big settlement on the route with a large market. So, it is recommended that the trekkers can buy anything they might have missed out by Purola itself. It also is the last village where most of the mobile networks work.The drive after Purola is through a beautiful forest of pine trees. In some distance, on top of a hill we can see the Jawahar Navodaya Vidyalaya overlooking the valley. From near the village of Mori, the river Tons flows beside us till about Netwar. The fall in temperature can be felt from here. We officially enter Govind Pashu Vihar Wildlife Sanctuary after we cross a check post at Netwar. It can be considered the southern gateway to the sanctuary as most of the treks across the region are accessed from here onwards. The northern border of the sanctuary merges into Himachal Pradesh. Close to here, the rivers of Rupin and Supin merge to form Tons, which is the largest tributary of Yamuna and in fact larger than Yamuna itself, in terms of volume of flow. The peak of Kedarkantha can be seen from various points along the way from here.We reach Sankri by early evening. It is a small village with a central market lined with a few shops. The village has numerous apple orchards which are harvested starting from late summer. The market area is new compared to the old village area, a part of which is known as 'Saud'. The village also produces peach, apricots and potatoes. One can see the Swargarohini peak from here on a clear day. We rest at night in a guest house or in camps.

Day 2:  Sankri to Chillurgad via Taluka Altitude: 6,455 ft (1,967 m) to 8,160 ft (2,487 m) via 6,916 ft (2,108 m)
Time taken: 5-6 hours. 12 km drive to Taluka + 10 km trek to Chillurgad

Trek gradient: Flat gradient for first 3 kms. After Beeda ka Thatch is a gradual ascent and Descent all through the trail.
Water sources: You can refill your water bottles in the river along the trail. There is a four-wheel-drive road that connects Sankri with Taluka. If you’re trekking on your own, you can either hire a jeep (locally) for this, subject to the condition of the road, or walk toTaluka. This is a landslide prone route, and is often closed during the monsoons. The trail to Taluka is almost level, going through 10-11 mountain bends. On the way, there are three big streams, almost submerging sections of the road in water. The hike is scenic, going past a series of wild roses and irises and bamboo, chestnut and cedar (deodar) trees. Just 2 km before Taluka, there is a campsite beside a stream. You can camp here if there isn’t enough time to go to Puani Garaat i.e if you’re hiking from Sankri. There is also a GMVN Guest house at Taluka for accommodation. The dhaba food is very basic.

Trekkers with Indiahikes drive from Sankri to Taluka (12 km, 1 hour). Taluka is a small village with concrete houses. This is quite a contrast from the architecture in neighbouring villages like Sankri, Osla and Gangad, which are close to 300 years old. We start the trek towards Bhida Ka Thach from Taluka.

Next to the forest guest house, the trail descends to the river valley of Thamsa and continues through a series of forests, while the river remains on your right. This shepherds’ trail goes along the river on a level walk. Around 10 minutes into the hike, spot the first cemented bridge over a small stream. Another 15 minutes of level walk will have you reach another bridge, this time, a wooden one. These two spots are conducive to fill up drinking water.

From here, walk uphill for 15 minutes till you see a small clearing next to the river. You can set up an emergency camp here if need be.

Another 10-15 minutes later, you’ll come across a spot where you can climb down to a tributary of River Thamsa. Look for a wooden bridge to cross this river, which is just below Datmir village. After crossing the tributary, you’ll reach a camping ground in a couple of minutes. From here, facing the inner part of the valley, locate two trails, one moving upwards and another going straight ahead. Take the second route straight ahead. Har Ki Dun The trek starts under the shade of coniferous trees . The undulating trail gradually climbs to Gangad – the first village on the trail. The trail from here is in bad condition as it is prone to landslides. After 10-15 minutes of level walk, you will find land cleared by shepherds to set up temporary night shelters. From here, the trail climbs up, alternating between upward and level walks. Around 10 minutes into the hike, look out for your first landslide-prone section. You may have to come down the river and cross the section that has caved in due to landslide. Around 20 minutes on this trail will lead you to a spot where there is a wooden bridge to cross over River Thamsa. Ignore the bridge and proceed ahead. After 5 minutes, the trail turns steep and criss-crosses upwards. This section will take about 15-20 minutes to cover. During monsoon, expect this trail to be completely covered in mud. The trail will now relax with a series of level walks. Soon you’ll approach a stream coming down the hill on your right, with a wooden bridge over it. For trekkers trekking by themselves, they can camp at the further camp site of Puani Garaat. The trail picks up a little altitude as you enter the forest again. After 30-40 minutes, look for an old village across the river on your left. This is Gangaad. From here, 20 minutes later, take a diversion towards your right until you reach a dhaba next to a wooden bridge. Behind the dhaba is a small hut, where locals use the momentum of water to run a mechanical turbine that grinds cereal into flour.

Just 25 metres before the wooden bridge, on the right is Puani Garaat. There is also a cemented structure here. Since it’s incomplete,  it is not possible to stay in it comfortably. However, if the weather is getting bad and you can’t proceed, you may stay there. This is the campsite and you can pitch your tent here for the night.

An alternative for Puani Garaat campsite: Those who want to camp at Osla have to cross the wooden bridge.You will then get onto the left side of River Thamsa and trek along the river to reach Osla.

An alternative route from Puani Garaat: To reach Seema, one has to trek straight up on the true right of the river all the way to Seema. There are a few steep ascents, but the trail relaxes into a gradual walk often. The landscape and terrain will remain like this for around 90 minutes.

From Seema, walk straight towards a bridge over Thamsa and get onto the left side of the valley. From here, look for a small cemented bridge some 60 metres above you. There is a small broken trail that connects to this bridge. Soon, you will connect with the level trail coming from Osla on the left. It goes straight ahead and will lead to Har-ki-dun. Osla-har-ki-doon The ancient village of Osla hangs up on the left side of the valley. It is also the last settlement on the trail

Continue on the trail by heading to Osla village, which involves crossing the bridge and walking alongside the river till you reach Osla. Osla is a small village, about 9,000 ft above sea level. It is famous for a Someshwar Temple. Some people say it is the temple of Someshwar Devta (an avatar of Lord Shiva). The architecture of this temple is a wonder in itself. The villagers of Osla are proud of two things – one, living in the Himalayas and two, their satellite phone. Spend some time here and explore the village before moving on. From Osla, the trail comprises a few steep sections but generally leisurely level-walks. Within half an hour, you’d have crossed two streams, out of which the second one has a wooden bridge running over it. There is also a local temple to the right. Cross the bridge and traverse around the mountain bend. You can now see a series of meadows in front of you. After hiking for 15 minutes, you will enter the first of a series of cleared lands. Note that some of the land has been used for cultivation. From here, there are two more mountain bends that you need to traverse. The upward incline will gradually increase as you walk alongside a huge field of boulders and grass. This whole section to reach the top of the mountain bend may take around 90 minutes.

You will see a makeshift wooden bridge below the valley over Thamsa. If you want to trek to the meadows of Dev Thach, Ruinsara Taal and Bali Pass, cross this bridge. To go to Har ki Dun, ignore the bridge and walk ahead . As you walk past a series of wheat fields, look out for two of the highest residential buildings in this region. The trail ascends over the confluence of Thamsa and Ruinsara rivers to a vantage point with views of the snowcapped mountains of Dhauladhar. The climb is steep but the beautiful landscape compensates for the struggle. As you reach this vantage point, look for Kalanag (Black Peak) and Bandarpooch ranges looming in the distance.


Day 3: Chillurgad to Kalkatiyadhar Altitude: 8,160 ft (2,487 m) to 9,922 ft (3,024 m)
Time taken: 3-4 hours, 6-7 km

Trek gradient: Easy. Initial descent of 15 minutes followed by mostly level walk for about 90 minutes. Steep climb for 15 minutes followed by a level walk and boulder section finishing off with a gradually ascending trail. Water sources: You can refill your water bottles from the river along the trail The meadows of Dev Thach are clearly visible on your right, across the confluence of the two rivers. At this point, you have crossed 3,000 m altitude for the first time. The valley now separates into two, with Har-ki-dun on the left and Ruinsara Taal, Bali Pass on the right. As you cross the mountain bend, you are greeted with the sight of the Har Ki Dun peak and Hata Peak, below which is Har-ki-Dun valley. The campsite is now only 4 km away through pine forests and meadows. The trail initially descends as you trek and then becomes level for about 15-20 minutes. After this, the trail crosses multiple streams. The pine forest has a sizable number of rhododendron trees. There is also a lovely stream gushing down on the way, with a variety of Himalayan alpine flowers along its sides, especially blue poppy. About an hour later, pass through another section of meadows with a delightful growth of chestnut. The smell of cedar and pine wood trees is intoxicating to any nature lover. After another 20 minutes, you reach a small waterfall and leave the meadows behind. From this spot, you have to negotiate a steep climb of about 15 minutes. Slowly, patches of snow start appearing on your trail and become prominent after a while (snow is seen only till the end of May). After 15 minutes of level walk, spot another wooden bridge. From this junction there is a short climb of 10 minutes, over boulders, till you reach another camping ground. The final forest stretch lies in front of you. After half an hour over a gradual incline, you traverse the forest ridge from the left side of the valley.

As you cross over, look for Forest Guest House huts just in front of you above a small ridge. Walk for the final 10 minutes along the camping ground next to Thamsa and cross the last wooden bridge to reach Har-ki-dun. Look at the two valleys opening up in front, divided by a stream called Karmanasha. The valley towards your left is going to Maninda Taal and Borasu Pass and the other, to Jaundar Glacier.


Day 4: Kalkatiyadhar to Boslo via  Har-ki-Dun Altitude: 9,922 ft (3,024 m) to 10,469 ft (3,191 m) via 11,700 ft (3,566 m) Time taken: 5-6 hours, 10

Trek gradient: Easy. Initial descent of 15 minutes followed by mostly level walk for about 90 minutes. Steep climb for 15 minutes followed by a level walk and boulder section finishing off with a gradually ascending trail.
Water sources: You can refill your water bottles from the river along the trail
Distance: 3 km (Maninda Taal) Time taken: 4 hours

When you reach Har-ki-Dun, the sheer beauty of the valley will make you never want to leave the place. So, a rest day at the campsite is highly recommended. At Har-ki-Dun, one can see the vast grounds below Swaragrohini-1 peak. The meadows here are full of alpine flowers. You can explore the entire ground in about an hour or two.


Day 5: Har ki Dun to Seema (2,600 m) 3 to 4 hours' trek: 10 km

The journey back to Seema is an easy walk. We take the very same route which we used to reach to Har Ki Dun. After the initial descent through the forest we trace back our way towards Kalkatidhar, the rather exposed section of the trek. On the route we come across a good view of the trail all the way to Osla and see the valley descend towards Taluka, around the curve of the ridge where the two streams comng from Har Ki Dun and Ruinsara respectively, converge. A little short of this intersection we can get a glimpse of a trail to our left marked by a sight of a bridge down over the stream. This trail goes to join the trail to Ruinsara lake and is rarely taken. After reaching Osla, one can roam about in the village, talk to locals and soak in the Garhwali culture. Again we can either set camp or stay with a local family.

Day 6 : Seema to Sankri Trek:_4-5 hrs | 14 km 1 hour drive

Early in the morning, we leave the settlement of Seema and trek till Taluka. The walk is downhill and hence takes lesser time than before. We walk to the true left of the River Supin until we finally arrive at Taluka, from where a vehicle takes us back to Sankri. We retire for the day in camp alongside the river or in a guest house in Sankri.

Day 7: Sankri to Dehradun Drive: 8 hrs

The trek to Har ki Dun concludes today as we leave Sankri and reach Dehradun by late afternoon.

Har ki Dun Trek - Travel Guide, Trekking Tips, Itinerary

Har Ki Doon Trek - Trek in Uttarakhand. One of the most famous and adventurous Trekking in Uttarakhand is Har Ki Doon valley. Har Ki Dun trek is a picturesque offbeat place that lies in the western Himalayas. Full of flawless natural treasures, Har ki dun valley is known as Valley of Gods. One of the distinct multi-day treks that are also easy, Har Ki Dun is an apt trek to spend some days away from nuances of fast city life.

Explore Har ki Dun, one of the most beautiful Trek in Uttrakhand. Join us for this trek perfect for beginners with Treks and Trails India.One of the most gorgeous among Uttarakhand's trekking destinations, Har Ki Doon in the Garhwal Himalayas at. is a hanging valley famed for exquisite beauty. Har Ki Dun Trek Tour Package Itinerary with great deals and discounts. Book the Har Ki Dun Trek from Delhi, Dehradun at the guaranteed lowest price !!!

6 Nights 7 Days 14 Dec, 01 Mar, 07 Mar, and more
Inclusions/Exclusions
What we'll give/What we won't

What is included in the tour

  • Transport support from and to Dehradun: starting from pickup on day 1 to drop on day 7.
  •  Guide and cook fees.
  •  Rent for camping equipment.
  •  Forest entry charges.
  •  Porter and mule support to carry camping equipment. Please note that personal luggage can be carried by mules and/or porters on chargeable basis.
  • All veg meals starting from day 1 dinner to day 7 breakfast.
  • Tented accommodation throughout the trek.

What is NOT included in the tour

  • Transport to reach Dehradun from hometown.
  • Personal expenses like tips, personal medicines, phone calls etc.
  • Any transport support during the trek apart from what is included above.
  • Accommodation in Dehradun.
  • Personal luggage with mass not exceeding 12 kg per bag per person can be carried by porters/mules @ Rs 300 per day per bag. This amounts to a total of Rs 1,500/- per bag for all trekking days.
  • For a nominal charge of Rs 300 per person per night, we can arrange for Homestay in the village of Osla on request. The amount goes directly to the local family hosting us.
Things to Carry
Things to Carry
  • 1 Pair of Thermal
  • 3 Pair of Socks + 1 Pair of woolen socks
  • 2 Pair of Hand Gloves (Water Proof & Fleece material)
  • Sun Cap
  • Woolen Cap
  • Neck Warmer (Scarf/Buff)
  • 2 Quick Dry Full Sleeves (T-Shirt)
  • 1 Full sleeves Fleece
  • 1 Wind Proof Jacket (windcheater/Heavy Jacket)
  • 2 Track Pants (No Cotton or Jeans)
  • UV sunglasses
  • Sun scream, Lip balm, Moisturizer
  • Torch
  • Trek Pole
  • Trekking Shoes (No Sports shoes or Woodland shoes)
  • Poncho (The Gear used to protect from Rain)
  • Day pack (Small one)
  • Back Pack 60 liter (+ Rain cover)
  • 2 Water Bottles
  • Toilet Paper & Wet Wipes
  • Hand Sanitizer
  • Antibacterial Powder
  • Tooth Brush
  • Quick Dry Towel

 

Medical Disclosures

  • Crocin (1Strip)
  • Disprine (1 Strip)
  • Lomotive (1 Strip)
  • Digene (1Strip)
  • Guaze
  • Dettol
  • Band Aid - Qty 5
  • Neusphorine Powder
  • Betadine Tube
  • Vomistop/Avomine (Motion Sickness Tablet)
FAQ
Frequently Asked Questions

The FAQ on Har Ki Doon Valley Trek:

1.    How difficult is the Har ki doon valley trek?

Har ki doon valley trek in comparison is easy to moderate difficulty with another high altitude trek.

2.    How much distance do we have to trek each day?

On an average, we cover roughly 4-8kms between our camping stations.

3.    What will happen if a trek is extended?

Beyond our controllable reasons when the trek is extended, then additional charges tend to be applied.

4.    Who will be our lead guide person?

Lead guide person is certified & experienced personnel. These guides are locally sourced and have other team members including local guides, cook, helpers and porters.

5.    Is this trek safe for girls?

Our treks are planned with a male: female ratio. As an organizer, we make sure that their tents are shared only with other female trekkers.

6.    Many people in a tent?

Our tents are all three person tents.

7.    What is the level of fitness expected from the trekkers?

Good physical and mental fitness is expected to complete the Trek. Har ki doon valley trek is ideal for beginners to familiarize themselves with similar high altitude treks.

8. Typical Food menu during a trek?

We make sure that wholesome and nutritious breakfast, lunch and evening snacks are served. We believe and serve only vegetarian food as it is easy to digest and preferable in high altitudes.

9.    What if we encounter a medical emergency?

We are trained to manage emergencies in high altitudes. Our lead guide is professional and experienced. Our team do carry emergency first aid kits and oxygen cylinder.

Activity
Trekking, North India Treks
Destination
Uttarakhand
Duration
5-7 Days